Lisolia #poetry #dVerse

It was a pebble made of glass
I held it in my hand
bygone-milk-bottle-blue it was
had washed up on the sand

It’s once-rough edges all worn smooth
ground with the weathering
like my rough heart, fallen to earth
then stirred by tide and rain.

I held it to the light, observed
it’s dull opacity
some echo of how it had served
yet unrevealed to me.

Silent pebble, talisman
you guard your secrets still
you hold a truth which no one can
divine, for good nor ill.

And so I cast you back to earth
whisper a passing curse
under my tongue, beneath my breath
for better or for worse.

© 202experimentsinfiction.com. All Rights Reserved.

Written for dVerse

Tonight, Linda hosts Poetics, and has given us a choice of words from The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows by John Koenig. We are to choose one (or more!) words from a list, and write a poem around it, or about it. I chose the following:

Lisolia: the satisfaction of things worn down by time, broken in baseball mitts, the shiny snout of a lucky bronze pig, or footprints ground deep into floorboards by generations of kneeling monks.

I just love the sound of the word, which immediately made me think of a sea-glass pebble…

90 thoughts on “Lisolia #poetry #dVerse

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  1. I always think there is something poetic about those glass pebbles, smoothened by the sea, and you did it; had me comfortably sitting, sighing at the nice lines…till I was hit by the last stanza….that was a shock, and so, so clever….

    1. There was a very tiny hint of what “might” come with “talisman” but that sudden throwing back/cursing MADE the poem….

  2. This is incredibly poignant, Ingrid! I especially like; “It’s once-rough edges all worn smooth ground with the weathering like my rough heart, fallen to earth then stirred by tide and rain.”💝💝

  3. An inspired rocking of the prompt. Your word-smithing was excellent (some lines already noted) . I’ve never thought of random pieces of glass as pebbles, but it’s a lovely matching.

  4. If I were to say that this reads as though it had written itself, I would mean merely that it is so smooth and deftly turned out, that only a lot of work could’ve made it appear so; a wonderful rarity; a gem, in fact, Ingrid x

  5. I love beach glass! Judging by the prices of the beach glass jewelry in the gift shops, other people do too.

    Your poem is beautiful. <3 I liked the comparison in your poem of a human heart and a piece of blue beach glass, both worn down by time, both possessing a unique beauty.

    I wondered a bit about why the person discarded the beach glass. I think it may be that the person realized that a piece of lucky beach glass was unable to solve life's problems…kind of how you might feel when you discover that your psychiatrist has a psychiatrist. 🙂

    1. Wow, that’s such a great explanation, Cheryl! I didn’t really know why myself, but now you say it, it makes perfect sense 😅❤️

  6. I love sea glass. Growing up in a state surrounded on three sides by the great Lakes, I can vividly remember scouring beaches for it, and for driftwood and shells, and putting them in glass jars to set in the window to catch the light.

  7. There are so many pieces the beach and ocean can inspired. It is such a great place to wonder. Lovely piece Ingrid.

    I particularly liked this stanza:

    “I held it to the light, observed
    it’s dull opacity
    some echo of how it had served
    yet unrevealed to me.”

  8. Mmm…. what a warm piece of writing. Your genuinely have a good style and a good grasp of what you write about. The imagery, the vivid description, the symbolism… all are rich. Poetry at it’s peak. Keep writing. 💖👏

  9. Silent pebble, talisman
    you guard your secrets still
    you hold a truth which no one can
    divine, for good nor ill.

    It took me a minute to realize that you were rhyming, Ingrid, because it flowed so naturally… and this stanza is just amazing.

    <3
    David

      1. That’s what I meant really. The poem explains the title, as the title explains the poem. When the word is placed within the poem, it becomes just a word that doesn’t have a meaning. I enjoyed your sea glass, and yes, it made the meaning of lisolia very clear.

  10. As I read this, Ingrid, I felt Wordsworth and Coleridge would have loved it, so naturally does the memory revisited occur and looked over like the glass pebble, transformed into a hard, glittering opacity, cursed for its lack of answers. Especially loved this metaphor: “like my rough heart, fallen to earth/then stirred by tide and rain.” Beautiful.

  11. Beautiful rhyme and comparison between the pebble and your heart, Ingrid, and I love the moment you describe. Holding it up to the light and admiring it, then muttering a curse under breath before tossing it away! Great image too 🙂

  12. I used to love occasionally finding those colored glass fishing net floats when I walked the Oregon Coast. I really enjoyed your discovery piece here Ingrid. Finding, wondering, then releasing — a wonderful cycle! 🙂

  13. Poignant with the feel of used things, and with a sense that worn as they are with some use, they remain foreign and unknown. A poem of mysterious beauty and purpose.

  14. on my (now more infrequent) walks on the beach, I always look for blue sea-glass, which is supposedly more rare. I admire how you use your pen to describe the term, showing and not telling, as it were ~

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